Pee Gee Hydrangea

SKU-A80A313F
$28.99
OR
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Color
White,
Categories
Shrubs
Bloom Season
Summer, Spring,
Bloom Season
Summer, Spring,
Height At Maturity
Under 10 Feet
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
Zone
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,
grow-zone
Planting Zones 3-9
Ships
November Through April
Exposure
Sun And Shade, Full Sun,
Exposure
Sun And Shade, Full Sun,
Usage
Border Plants, Flowering,
Usage
Border Plants, Flowering,
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Shipping

Shipping Information

We dig fresh our plants and ship immediately. We ship US Mail, Priority shipping. You will receive a tracking number once your plants ship. All plants will be fine in their packages for up to 3 days after receiving.

How We Protect Your Plants For Transit

We sell only bare root plants. We dip the roots in tera-sorb silicone gel to retain ample moisture for transit and surround with plastic. This is superior protection for plants in transit for up to 12 days.

Upon Receipt Of Your Plants

Open your plants and inspect the same day received. We offer 3 days to report any problems with your order. Bare root plants need to be planted within 2-3 days of receiving unless weather-related problems prohibit planting. Store in a cool place and keep roots moist and covered with plastic until they can be planted. Water for the first week daily after planting.

Shipping Dates
Ships November through April

Description

Pee Gee Hydrangea Care and Maintenance

Preparing hydrangeas for winter is easy; however, pruning techniques vary between varieties. And sometimes, pruning isn’t even necessary. When pruning is desired, it may take place in late fall, late winter, or early spring; however, there is an advantage to cutting them back in late fall because there’s less plant to protect against the coming cold.

Unless pruning all stems to ground level, always remove dead and weak stems, as well as spent flowers, leaving healthy buds intact.

Before and after the pruning of each shrub, clean the blades of your pruning shears with rubbing alcohol to control diseases spreading and/or pests from one plant to another.

Pruning Pee Gee Hydrangea Plants

Big Leaf Hydrangea consists of both lace cap and mophead varieties. Hydrangeas may be cut back in the fall or early spring. Do not remove any items that have not bloomed — these contain next year’s blooms.

Pruning Pee Gee Hydrangeas

Because the foliage of Oakleaf Hydrangea provides a welcome color display in the fall, winter pruning is often left for early spring. Retain stems that have not bloomed — they will be next year’s floral display and never remove more than one-third of the plant.

Hardy hydrangeas bloom on new wood; therefore, they are generally cut back to the ground. If taller plants are desired, the shrub may be cut back to a height of one to three feet.

Since hardy hydrangeas have an upright growth habit, they may be trained to grow as a tree.

Pruning Annabelle Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens)

Hydrangea arborescens are also pruned to the ground since their blooms develop on new wood. Pruning may take place in late winter or early spring.

Pruning Climbing Hydrangea (Hydrangea animal)

Because they produce blooms on side shoots, climbing hydrangea does not require pruning. If you decide to give them a trim, however, do so in the late fall when they have finished blooming. Cut shoots back to the last healthy bud.

Winter Protection for In-Ground Hydrangeas

Winter protection should be in place for in-ground hydrangeas prior to the first fall frost and will remain until the last spring frost. To protect your hydrangea plants, you’ll need to build a frame around the entire plant. The frame is then wrapped with netting, burlap, chicken wire, or some other material to create a cage that allows airflow while also retaining an insulative material such as leaves and/or pine needles.

Because they don’t settle like other insulative choices, oak leaves offer exceptional protection against the cold. If you have oak trees or know someone who does, the leaves can be bagged and saved for later use should settling occur.

When adding insulative materials, care should be taken not to damage the ends of the branches. Broken branches translate into fewer blooms during the upcoming season.

Winter Protection for Potted Hydrangeas

When protecting potted hydrangeas, you have a few choices. The easiest and best option is to bring the plant inside before the first frost. A greenhouse shed or some other outbuilding works well to protect your potted plants. This may not be an option, however, if the plant and/or pot is too cumbersome to move.

If the potted plant must remain outside, you’ll need to protect both the pot and the plant against the elements. A cage may be built around the potted plant just as those built around an in-ground plant. An insulative material is used to fill the cage to protect the plant.

A protective barrier may be created using rigid foam insulation panels as well.

Fleece jackets can be purchased and used to protect the pot and plant. Or, you may purchase fleece fabric and wrap it around the potted plant to protect it from the elements.

Why is Winter Care So Important?

Winter care is important for hydrangeas because they begin to cultivate new bloom growth for next year during the warmer months prior to the first fall frost this year. If these tender new buds are not protected against the effects of wind and cold weather, they may be damaged before they have a chance to adorn your garden with beautiful flowers and lush bushes next summer.

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